Currently viewing the tag: "New Orleans"

Bored with New Orleans? Been to Bourbon Street and done that?

Take a trip across the Muddy Mississippi to Algiers, Louisiana’s answer to what N’Awlins was 100 years ago. It’s sleepy, it’s full of classic Old Louisiana architecture, it’s quiet, and jazz, booze and good people are still ubiquitous, only without the hustlers and bustlers. There is one wine bar–the highly recommended Vine & Dine–and three *bar* bars on this side of the river: Dry Dock Bar (open most of the day and serving decent pub food), Crown and Anchor English Pub (open at 4, much to our mid-day dismay, though we’ve heard only great things), and the Old Point Bar, our personal favorite. It’s low-key and local, dog friendly and people friendly, a favorite hangout of the neighborhood roller derby team, and well-behaved pups are welcome to join their owners for a drink at the  bar. So really, a win-win-win.

What's your poison, pup?

They also have a brand-new dart board, decent darts, and an OK pool table. And brass bands randomly stop by for entertainment. Because New Orleans.

At the Old Point Bar

Random Brass Band

Don’t let the bar tenders and patrons intimidate you; just smile and be patient, and you’ll be a local in no time, and it’s worth it.

At the Old Point Bar

Playing Darts at the Old Point Bar

The neighborhoods are worth a walk, especially if you love the homes in the Garden District but hate the pretentiousness. Take the regular, quick, and very free ferry from the foot of Canal Street (right next to the Aquarium of the Americas) and watch the skyline of New Orleans unfold before you. A great point to watch the New Year’s Ever fireworks or any other sky-bound event in the Crescent City. Keep in mind that ferries BACK TO the city end after rush hour, and while there is a bridge across the Mississippi, it adds an extra 45 minutes and taxi drivers can be hesitant to make the journey, especially during tourist seasons.

At the Old Point Bar

At the Old Point Bar

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Who here has ever heard of Pavillion, Wyoming? No one? Right.

So it stands to reason that no one has ever heard of Miss Ginny’s Roost Steakhouse, either, right?

Which is really too bad. This place is classic.

Pavillion is a town of fewer than 300 hearty residents and no less than 150 miles from any major road. In the middle of nowhere, this place looks up at the Wind River Mountains, down into the Wind River Indian Reservation, and over at the endless high planes of Wyoming. For most of us, there is no reason to ever go to the town; I’ve lived in the same county for four years and had never been there until this weekend. There is no way you would find yourself accidentally passing through. It boasts a post office in a double wide, a general store with a “Basketeria” sign out front, and a bar. And most importantly, The Roost.

Image courtesy of County 10

The owner, Ginny Warren, came to Wyoming after Katrina when she had finally had enough of the hurricanes. Why she chose the little cattle ranching community of Pavillion, I don’t know, but she brought with her a love of crawfish, Cajun spices, and the NOLA dining experience. I’ve seen it described on places like Trip Advisor as a “typical” cowboy steakhouse or saloon, and it’s really not, unless you’re talking just about the Old West façade out front. The building itself looks like something out of Tombstone. But inside, there is very little that screams “Wyoming” except maybe the prevalence of cowboy hats among the clientele. In fact, the interior looks more like something you’d find in rural Louisiana: pink flamingo décor, faded wood accents, perpetual Christmas lights, checkered tablecloths, plenty of kitsch to go around.

And last weekend, thanks to a random Facebook post and a brilliant idea, we found ourselves making the 40-minute trek from Lander, WY, to Pavillion (even compared to a town in the middle of nowhere, this place is in the middle of nowhere) for a New Orleans Easter Sunday Brunch. Like most of the seatings, The Roost features a multi-course, prix fix menu with your choice of Cajun or Creole or otherwise New Orleans main course.

Be forewarned: the service can be a bit (a lot) slow. Partially due to the New Orleans culture—which generally encourages sitting and enjoying and sitting and enjoying some more—and partially due to the small town and limited availability of servers. So come prepared to spend time hanging out and socializing; trust me, it’s worth it.

Our brunch looked something like this:

Starter: beignets (of course)

Second Course: three shooters of delicious soups, including carrot bisque, sausage gumbo (of which I could eat many, many more shots!), and mock turtle

Third Course: shrimp rémoulade

Salad: baby spinach, berry, goat cheese, and candied walnuts

Main Course: between the two of us, we tried the cowboy eggs Benedict, with medium-rare, locally-raised steak medallions instead of Canadian bacon; and sautéed shrimp and baked cheesy grits with a homemade, whole wheat biscuit

Dessert:  we had the lemon cloud (basically a lemon custard with a graham cracker crust) and the dreamsickle cheesecake, which tasted just like an orange creamsickle (I mean, JUST like!)

And drinks: a standard mimosa; a brandy milk punch with brandy, milk, sugar, and nutmeg; an Easter egg basket of (very adult!) cheery vodka, triple sec, cream, grenadine, a coconut rim, and a peep for posterity; and a Louisiana Purchase, made with Grand Marnier, grapefruit juice, and…. Other stuff? Honestly, by that point, who cared? It was dry, crisp, and refreshing!

Me, Enjoying my Easter Egg Basket

I would just like to say that everything was delicious. The beignets were bite-sized and made a wonderful introduction to the meal.  The gumbo was nothing short of amazing, and apparently Ginny serves it as a main course for dinner. The rémoulade was light and just a little spicy. My sautéed shrimp was flavorful but not spicy, but several shakes of hot sauce fixed that, and the grits were perfect. And steak instead of Canadian bacon?!?!? Holy cow! And the desserts were generous and refreshing and rich. Other main courses included a pain au chocolate, grillades (apparently akin to a chicken fried steak) with baked jalapeno grits, crawfish frittata, and biscuits and gravy. Not really vegetarian friendly, but what is in Wyoming? (Answer: absolutely nothing; this IS cattle country, after all)

The menu changes every day that they are open, and Ginny tries to emphasize ingredients that are seasonal or seasonally festive, and each dish is handpicked by the diligent, if a bit scatterbrained, owner. Currently, The Roost is open Thursday, Friday, and Saturday starting at 5:00 pm. Sometimes she gives Sunday brunches a whirl, and she often does special meals for holidays. Keep up with (often last minute) updates on Facebook or give her a call at (307) 857-6019 and leave a message. Reservations are often recommended just so Ginny knows how much of each course to prepare.

Pavillion, WY, is certainly not a place you would stumble on by happenstance, and because of the remote nature of the community, Miss Ginny’s Roost isn’t the kind of place you would just drive by and think, “Man, that looks interesting; let’s try it!” (though if you ever DID find yourself in town, it certainly would be the kind of place that would draw in random travelers) And though it’s off the beaten path, this unique, Cowboy Cajun hidaway is worth a stop, whether you’re passing through Wyoming on your way to Yellowstone or you’ve lived in Lander for years.

Roost on Urbanspoon

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